Mar 18

Is Boeing finally admitting responsibility?

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Edited: Mar 18

 

Boeing CEO, President and Chairman, Dennis Muilenburg has tonight, released a statement confirming a software update is being finalised for their 737 MAX aircraft to deal with ‘erroneous sensor inputs’.

 

This statement is in reply to Ethiopian Transport Minister Dagmawit Moges’s report today, which he stated,

"Clear similarities were noted between Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 and Indonesian Lion Air Flight 610, which would be the subject of further study during the investigation.”

 

Although Boeing have already made statements on the two MAX accidents, the MCAS issue, and pilot training directive, it’s a positive action to see the Boeing CEO make comment on the situation.

However, as a fan of Boeing aircraft, and a regular air travel comuter, it’s upsetting to clearly see Boeing and Mr Muilenburg are gambling with lives when the 737 MAX aircraft has a detrimental flaw. Let’s be clear, my opinions are based on the facts we already know. What’s most upsetting is to see the FAA and Boeing avoiding grounding the MAX until the rest of the world had done the right thing in putting safety first, both Boeing and the FAA have sent the incorrect signal here and why?

 

What is clear is Boeing are to make sure the 737 MAX is the safest and that’s all we can ask for, but Boeing, regardless of anything else don’t let trying to maintain the world‘s best-selling aircraft be at the detriment of overlooking the most important aspect here, our LIVES!

 

 

 

 

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